Updates

Holding the line for clean air

The coal lobby is trying to block the EPA from protecting public health, but we’ve held the line against some of their worst attacks: In March 2011, the U.S. Senate rejected a bill that would have blocked standards for soot, mercury and carbon pollution. In April, the Senate defeated four more bills that would have blocked the EPA from cutting air pollution.

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Wind Energy Could Reduce Pollution Equivalent to Half a Million Cars in Georgia

Savannah, GA -- The carbon pollution equivalent to over 500,000 cars could be eliminated in Georgia if wind power continues its recent growth trajectory, according to a new analysis by Environment Georgia. 

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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

If America were to take advantage of just a frac- tion of its wind energy potential to get 30 percent of its electricity from the wind by 2030, the nation could cut carbon emissions from power plants to 40 percent below 2005 levels. That much wind power would help states meet and exceed the carbon dioxide emission reductions called for

by the Environmental Protection Agency’s draft Clean Power Plan, and help the nation meet its commitment to cut U.S. carbon pollution by 26 to 28 percent by 2025. 

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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

America's Dirtiest Power Plants

Cleaning up power plants is one of the most important steps the U.S. can take to reduce the threat of global warming. In 2012, U.S. power plants produced more carbon pollution than the entire economies of Russia, India, Japan or any other nation besides China. In fact, the 50 dirties U.S power planst alone - representing less than 1 percent of U.S. power planst - produces as much pollution in 2012 as the nation of South Korea (the world's sevent leading emitter of greenhouse gases).

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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

American wind power already produced enough energy in 2013 to power 15 million homes. Continued, rapid development of wind energy would allow the renewable resource to supply 30 percent of the nation’s electricity by 2030, providing more than enough carbon reductions to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan.

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News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Campaign Briefing: Proctor Creek a Poster Child for New Clean Water Rule

Atlanta, GA – Atlantans gathered near the banks of Proctor Creek, a waterway with a long history of abuse and neglect, to discuss the importance of the proposed Clean Water Rule.

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