Updates

Holding the line for clean air

The coal lobby is trying to block the EPA from protecting public health, but we’ve held the line against some of their worst attacks: In March 2011, the U.S. Senate rejected a bill that would have blocked standards for soot, mercury and carbon pollution. In April, the Senate defeated four more bills that would have blocked the EPA from cutting air pollution.

Blog Post

Clean water not green water | Russell Bassett

Last year at this time, the toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie caused nearly half a million people in and around Toledo, Ohio, to be without safe drinking water. Clean water from our taps is something that many of us take for granted, but if we don’t protect our water sources — like the residents of Toledo discovered — we won’t be able to take it for granted anymore.

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News Release | Environment Georgia

Georgia Senators Co-Sponsor Offshore Drilling Bill

“Dirty energy sources, like offshore oil and gas, endanger our coast and tourism industries. They are part of the past. Senators should support the clean, renewable energy Georgia needs for the future.”

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News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Environment Georgia Delivers 6,061 Petitions in Favor of First ‘Outstanding’ River

Atlanta, GA--At a public hearing held by the Environmental Protection Division (EPD) today Environment Georgia activists delivered over 6,000 petition signatures in favor of designating the Conasauga River as Georgia’s first ‘Outstanding’ river.

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News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Report: Utilities Vastly Undervalue Solar Energy

Atlanta, GA –Households and businesses with solar panels deliver greater benefits than they receive through programs like net metering, a report said today, countering increasing complaints from utilities that solar homeowners don’t pay their fair share.

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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Shining Rewards

Solar energy is on the rise in the United States. At the end of the first quarter of 2015, more than 21,300 megawatts of cumulative solar electric capacity had been installed around the country, enough to power more than 4.3 million homes. The rapid growth of solar energy in the United States is the result of forward-looking policies that are helping the nation reduce its contribution to global warming and expand its use of local renewable energy sources.

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