News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

New Report Shows Progress, Opportunities For Offshore Wind

Atlanta, Ga. (July 10, 2014) – A new report out today by the National Wildlife Federation outlines the significant progress made in the American offshore wind industry in recent years, and calls for leadership to fully realize the industry’s potential.

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

10 Million Pounds of Toxic Chemicals Dumped into Georgia’s Waterways

Savannah, GA--Industrial facilities dumped 10,132,268 pounds of toxic chemicals into Georgia’s waterways in 2012, making Georgia’s waterways the 8th worst in the nation according to a new report by Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center. The Savannah River and her tributaries received over 5 million pounds of toxic pollution making it the third worst in the country. 

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

EPA proposes first-ever limits on carbon pollution from power plants

Atlanta, GA – Today, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first-ever, federal limits on carbon pollution from power plants, the largest single source of global warming pollution in America. 

News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

New Report Highlights Solar Energy in Atlanta and Other Major U.S. Cities

Atlanta– Today, Environment Georgia was joined at the Atlanta headquarters of Hannah Solar by Atlanta’s Director of Sustainabilty, the Chairwoman of Atlanta’s Utility Committee and the CEO of Hannah Solar to release a new report, “Shining Cities:  At the Forefront of America’s Solar Energy Revolution.” The report provides a first-of-its-kind comparative look at the growth of solar power in major American cities.  

News Release | Environment Georgia

EPA Proposes Biggest Step for Clean Water in a Decade

Atlanta, GA- Today, in the biggest step forward for clean water in more than a decade, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed a rule to close loopholes in the Clean Water Act that leave 57% of Georgia’s streams and millions of acres of wetlands at risk of unchecked pollution and development.

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